Monthly Archives: September 2014

MSC’s Annual Acquaintance Party

MSC on its 25th year held its annual acquaintance day celebration, last June 20, 2014, Friday, with its actively participating faculty, staff and students.

acquaintance party 2014

Starting at exactly 8:30 in the morning, students of Grades 7, 8, 9 and fourth year assembled in the school hall. The program proper started with an invocation led by Kyle Javier,a Grade 9 student. It was followed by the national anthem led by the MSC Performing Arts, trained by Mr. Rene Antiporda and Ms. Krizzalyn Barrios, the Glee Club advisers. The opening remarks of the school principal, Mrs. Lerma S. Prudente, and inspirational message from Mr. Virgilio Y. Prudente, school president, have made everyone excited on their upcoming presentation.

Each year level presented their talents and special numbers with group dance performance and songs. The students showed and proved that each of them have talents that they can share and be proud of. The event included jail and message booths, which raised funds for the Student Council.

Yells and shouts filled the hall in the afternoon with the games presented by each group with  the winners receiving prizes. The   acquaintance party and program was successfully held as the first activity of the Student Council for this school year. It achieved the goal of the studentry in proving that learning cooperation and teamwork can be fun, and socialization will leave high school memories that will last and will never be forgotten.

—Rica Mae Comia

New Computer Programming Courses @ MSC

Why is Computer Programming important?

“The programmers of tomorrow are the wizards of the future.”
Gabe Newell, Founder of Valve Software: the creator of Dota & Counter-Strike

“One million of the best jobs will go unfilled because only 1 out of 10 schools teach students how to code”
http://code.org

“Everybody in this country should learn how to program a computer… because it teaches you how to think.” 

Steve Jobs, Co-founder of Apple Inc. & Pixar Animation Studios

Enroll in our new courses:

Introduction to Programming & Robotics (for ages 12 to 17)
Saturdays, 10 am to 12 noon

Introduction to Python Programming (for ages 12 to 17)
Saturdays, 1 to 3 pm

SCHEDULE: September 27 to December 6, 2014

Lego Mindstorm

Robotics Programming is a lot of Fun!

 

MSC 9 – Dividing by 5, 50, 0.5, etc.

Five (5) is  ten divided by two ( 10 / 2 ), so to divide a number by 10/2, we

  • multiply it by 2, then
  • divide by 10.

Since dividing by 10 only involves moving the decimal point one place to the left, we can easily divide by 5 by just using doubling or multiplication by 2.

To divide a number by 5 we can either

Method A:

  • double the number first then
  • move the decimal point one place to the left.

Method B

  • move the decimal point first then
  • double the number.

We recommend the method B.

Let us try method A first.

Example 9.1: Find 164 ÷ 5

  • Double 16 is 32 and double is 8. So 164 x 2 is 328.
  • Move the decimal point one place to the left to make it 32.8.

Now let us use the method B.

Example 9.2: Find 832 ÷ 5

  • Shifting the decimal point of the multiplicand one place to the left will make it 83.2. This also fixed the decimal point for the answer.
  • Doubling it gives 166.4.

Example 9.3: Find 1348 ÷ 50

  • Since 50 is half of 100 or 102, we move the decimal point in 1348 two places to the left making it 13.48.
  • We then double it to make it 26.96.

Example 9.4:  Find 24.5 ÷ 0.5

  • 0.5 is half of 1 or 10so we do not have to adjust the decimal point. Just double the number to produce 49.0.
  • The answer becomes obvious if we double both the dividend and the divisor: 24.5 ÷ 0.5 = 49.0 ÷ 1 = 49

 Example 9.5: How many mint candies costing 50 centavos each can I buy with P 24.50?

 The figures here are the same as in Example 9.4 and the solution here clarifies the technique we used earlier: We can buy 2 candies for one peso; so for 24.50 pesos we can buy 24.5 x 2 or 49 candies.

Example 9.6: Find 376 ÷ 0.05

  • 0.05 is half of 0.1 or 10-1so we have to move the decimal point one place to the right, meaning we have to add a zero making it 3,760.
  • Doubling it would result to 7,520.

Exercise 9: Compute the following:

  1. )     370 ÷ 5 =
  2. )     535 ÷ 5 =
  3. )     2,367 ÷ 5 =
  4. )     9,898 ÷ 5 =
  5. )     4,656 ÷ 50 =
  6. )     24,579 ÷ 50 =
  7. )     5,836 ÷ 500 =
  8. )     34,785 ÷ 500 =
  9. )     4,524 ÷ 0.5 =
  10. )    3,645 ÷ 0.05 =

Answers to all exercises are found in the answer key.

Discover the 25 Math Short Cuts ( 25 MSC )!

 

Converting Kilograms to Pounds and Pounds to Kilograms

A Kilogram is 2.204622622 pounds. But for practical purposes we can consider 1 kilo =  2.2 pound conversion. So we can convert kilos to pounds by multiplying by 2 then by 1.1or by 11 then by 0.2 depending on which is easier.

Kilos to pounds scale

Convert kilo to pounds and pounds to kilo

42 kilos is (42 x 2) x 1.1 = 84 x 1.1 = 92.4 lbs.

57 kilos is (57 x 2) x 1.1 = 114 x 1.1 = 125.4 lbs

Or (57 x 11) x .2 = 627 x .2 = 125.4 lbs

303 kilos is (303 x 11) x.2 = 3333 x .2 = 666.6 lbs.

A Pound is about 0.45359 kgs. We can use 1 pound = 0.45 kilograms which is about 99.2% accurate for ordinary computations. To multiply by 0.45 we can multiply by 0.9 then divide by 2 or vice versa.

35 lbs is (35 x 0.9) ÷  2 = 31.5  ÷ 2 = 15.75 kgs

78 lbs is ( 78 x .09) ÷  2 = 70.2  ÷  2= 35.1 kgs

120 lbs is ( 120 ÷ 2) x .9 = 60 x 0.9 = 54 kgs.

540 lbs is (540  ÷ 2) x 0.9 = 270 x 0.9 = 243kg

Note that if we multiply 0.45 by 2.2 we will get 0.99.

Simple, right?

MSC History Part IV – Start of 2 year courses at A. Flores St.

In 1991, MSC got the necessary permit to offer two-year courses in Office Management (OMC) and Computer Technology (CTC).  In June of that year, classes for the two courses started with fifty (50) OMC and twenty-six (26) CTC students.

MSC at that time was occupying the second floor of the Jesusa building (on the first floor was Monte de Piedad Savings Bank) along A. Flores St.  Its two classrooms had a capacity of  50 students only.  MSC had to set morning and afternoon sessions to accommodate the new two-year course students totaling more than 70.  Schedule for the short term course students were also set strategically so that there will be a classroom for each class.   Saturday and evening classes were conducted.

The short-term courses FCO (Fundamentals of Computer Operation) and FCP (Fundamentals of Computer Programming) became important subjects for the two-year courses.  Students studied DOS, Wordstar, Lotus and Dbase – software which a teen today may never have heard of, much more know how to use.  Computer screens were black and white and if you are not so lucky, “green”.

A requirement for these subjects was a set of diskettes – those thin, square plastic sheets containing a circular disk inside.  The 3.5-inch diskettes were rare then, the 5.25-inch floppies were the “in” thing.    Computers in the lab had no hard disk drives (only the office PC had disk drives) and the diskettes contain the software and the data.  PC users today will laugh at the thought that those floppy disks can contain a maximum of only 340kb!

Windows was unheard of and the Internet had not yet arrived in this part of the globe, but yes there were computer games, among them – Pacman, Block out, Space Invaders, Sokoban, etc.

Featured batch: MSC Computer Training Center first batch – class of 1993

The first batch of two year course students of MSC was initially composed of fifty (50) students for the Office Management Course (OMC) and twenty-six (26) Computer Technology Course (CTC) students.

During the first semester of school year 1991-92, classes were held at the second floor of the Monte de Piedad Savings Bank along A. Flores St.  By the second semester of that school year MSC has transferred to its new site at M. Paulino St. and this became the students second home for the rest of their stay at MSC.

The OMC class, due to its size had to be divided into two sections, the morning session and the afternoon session.  This did not prevent the group from being friends with everyone, regardless of their section and the course they were taking up.  Since they spend more time in the school they got to know students from the short term courses too.

Out of the 76 students who started with the batch, only 43 were able to finish the course.

 

Nieves Arguelles was the awardee for computer operations and Reynald “Jong” Vinluan was the awardee for computer programming.  Awards for loyalty were given to students who enrolled in at least one short-term course and went on to finish the two-year course. They were: Mary Jane Lat, Athena Amor Ramos, Aileen Rosales, Eugenia Vasquez, Ronald Aquino, Allan Panganiban, and Balthadeus Santiago.

Here is a complete list of the pioneer students of MSC:

Office Management Course:

Zoraida Abril
Joan Ada
Jean Joan Anila
Nieves Arguelles
Lorievel Audije
Myla Banaag
Jocelyn Bartolome
Joyce Bundalian
Imelda Calabia
Leila Ciar
Emelita Cornista
Franny Cosico
Raquel Dioyo
Jocelyn Echague
Raquel Empalmado
Edna Franco
Maribel Flores
Gina Gonzales
Melanie Gonzales
Ma. Regina Jestre
Mary Jane Lat
Ronnie Latayan
Grace Macandili
Laarni Ortiz
Nenette Panganiban
Athena Amor Ramos
Ma. Catleya Roque
Aileen Rosales
Yesa Teñido
Michaela Tolentino
Eugenia Vasquez

 

Computer Technology Course:

Sigfredo Adajar
Ronald Aquino
Juancho Artiaga
Danny Celerio
Roldan Dichoso
Nedeline Gutierez
Zandy Pangan
Allan Panganiban
Teodoro Pasia
Rita Ressureccion
Balthadeus Santiago
Reynald Vinluan

 

Free Financial Planning Seminar

Financial Planning Seminar at MSC

The FREE Financial Planning Seminar goes to San Pablo!  The seminar is open to the public and will be held at the MSC Green Campus in San Gabriel, hence it is especially convenient for MSC teachers, staff, alumni and friends.

What:  This two part event will have a “Practical Tips on Money Management” seminar/presentation then the attendees break up into smaller groups for financial coaching to create personal financial blueprints.

When: Sept 17, 2014, 4pm, Sept 24, 2014, 4pm

Where: MSC Institute of Technology Green Campus

To register for the event, you can simply text

SPSEMINAR <full name> <occupation> <optional email address>
to the following numbers
Sun: 0922 854 3244
Smart: 0939 939 9702
Globe: 0917 853 5069

Or you can send an email to aprudente@msc.edu.ph with SPSEMINAR in the subject line. Include in the email body your
— Name
— Occupation
— Cellphone Number

For inquiries simply call or email
Landline: 049 562 6006
Sun: 0922 854 3244
Smart: 0939 939 9702
Globe: 0917 853 5069
Email: aprudente@msc.edu.ph

MSC 8 – Multiplying by 9

Recall the x9 table.

9 x 1  = 09
9 x 2  = 18
9 x 3  = 27
9 x 4  = 36
9 x 5  = 45
9 x 6  = 54
9 x 7  = 63
9 x 8  = 72
9 x 9  = 81
9 x 10 = 90

If you look closely at the consecutive products of 9, you will see a pattern.The first digit of the product is in increasing order from 0 to 9; while the second digit is decreasing from 9 to 0.

There is also a pattern on how we arrive at the product.  When 9 is multiplied to a number, we see that the product is a 2-digit number and the first digit of this product is always one less than the number being multiplied by 9.The second digit of the product is the number which when added to the first digit would give a total of 9.

Another way of getting this table is to consider 9 as (10 -1). Thus


9 x 1 = (10 -1) x 1 = 10 – 1 or 09;
9 x 2 = (10 -1) x 2 = 20 – 2 or 18;
9 x 3 = (10 -1) x 3 = 30 – 3 or 27

and so on. This is the general method we will use to multiply by 9

Example 8.1: 23 x 9 = 207

23 x 9 = 23 x (10 – 1) = 230 – 23 = 207

Example 8.2: 357 x 9 = 3213

357 x 9 = 357 x (10 – 1) = 3570 – 357 = 3213

We can develop a further short-cut for this method.

Step 1) Place a bar separating the last digit from the other digits of the multiplicand.
Step 2) Add 1 to the left hand part
Step 3) Subtract the result from the number. The difference is the first part of the answer.
Step 4) The second part is the ten’s complement of the last digit of the multiplicand (which simply means we subtract the last digit from 10)

Example 8.3: 23 x 9 =

Step 1)  Place a bar separating the last digit 3 from the other digits of the multiplicand, so we place a bar between 2 and 3

2 | 3

Step 2) Add 1 to the left hand part, so we add 1 to 2 to get 3.

2 + 1 = 3

Step 3)  Subtract the result from the number. The difference is the first part of the answer, so we subtract  3 from 23, to get the first part of the answer, 20

23 – 3 = 20
Step 4) The second part is the ten’s complement of the last digit of the multiplicand, which simply means we subtract the last digit 3 from 10 to get the second part 7.

10 – 3 = 7

The first part is 20, and the second part is 7.

2 | 3 x 9 = 20 | 7 or 207

 Example 8.4: 357 x 9 = 

Step 1) 35|7
Step 2) 35 + 1 = 36
Step 3)357 – 36 = 321
Step 4) 10 – 7 = 3

35 | 7 x 9 = 321|3 or 3213

Since the steps are very simple we can combine some of them.

Example 8.5: 1248 x 9 =

Step 1)  Subtract 125 ( or 124 + 1 ) from 1248 to get the first part.

1248 – 125 = 1123
Step 2) Subtract 8 from 10 to get the second part

10 – 8 = 2

Combine the first part 1123 and the second part 2

1248 x 9 = 1123|2

If the multiplicand is long or complicated we can always resort to written subtraction, which is simpler than multiplication.

Example 8.6: 35,784 x 9 =

(34,784 – 3,479 ) | (10 – 4 )

32,205 | 6

35,784 x 9 = 322,056

Example 8.7: Dealers are given 10% discounts of the selling prices. What is the dealer’s price for an item worth P 1150?

Solution: When you are given a 10% discount, you pay 90% of the cost.

1150 – 115 = P1,035

Here’s how to use your fingers in multiplying by 9:

Spread out your hands and represent each of your fingers with the numbers from 1 to 10 as shown.

finger math1

When multiplying a number by 9, say 9 x 4, simply bend the finger that represents 4.  Count the number of fingers on the left of that finger – this will serve as the first digit of your product and the number of fingers on the right side of your bent finger represents the second digit of your answer.

finger math 2

 Exercise 8; Use (10-1) in multiplying by 9

  1. )      6 x 9 =
  2. )      9 x 9 =
  3. )      35 x9 =
  4. )      49 x 9 =
  5. )      82 x 9 =
  6. )      148 x 9 =
  7. )      285 x 9 =
  8. )      0. 9 x 68 =
  9. )      90% of 675 =
  10. )  45% of 740 =

Answers to all exercises are found in the answer key.

Discover the 25 Math Short Cuts ( 25 MSC )!

 

Featured Batch: MSC 3-year Office Management Course Class 1994-95 (first batch)

When MSC started offering computer classes, the first courses were short-term courses on computer operation and programming.  In the first semester of school year 1991-1992, two-year courses on Computer Technology and Office Management were offered to the growing number of MSC students.  Then in school year 1994-95, MSC offered the three-year courses on Computer Technology and Office Management.

Six fresh graduates of the two-year Office Management course enrolled in the new 3-year course.  These were:  Claire Ticzon, Aileen Metica, Aileen Tanodra, Jocelyn Maranan, Lina Jader, Raquel Dioyo, and Letty Changco.

class 95

Aside from the regular academic classes, these ladies underwent extensive training in the different offices of MSC.  Eventually, most were absorbed by the different departments and a few worked in the different MSC companies.

Claire and Aileen Metica became computer teachers in MSC partner schools, and later they were hired as MSC instructors.

Lina and Letty worked at MSC Data Exchange – MSC’s one-stop computer shop

Raquel Dioyo worked as Cashier at MSC.

Aileen Tanodra worked at Escuela de Valle Verde as teacher.

Jocelyn worked at the Hall of Justice of San Pablo City.

Where are they today?

  • Claire teaches at Canossa College, San Pablo and is married to an MSC alumnus, Owen Ignacio
  • Aileen Metica works and lives in Canada.
  • Letty, after working for MSC Data Exchange Co. as Graphic Artist for several years, now lives in Abu Dhabi and works as Finance and Administration Officer at Silec Cable
  • Aileen Tanodra lives and works in Singapore.
  • Jocelyn lives in San Pablo City and still works at the Hall of Justice
  • Lina, after many years with MSC Data Exchange Co., has her own business now.
  • Raquel is now a full-time wife and mother.